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BE SMART. Strategies for smart sustainable cities.

General objectives

  • Obtain knowledge regarding the challenges that the Sustainable Development Goals pose to urban development 
  • Learning analysis, design and intervention methods to stimulate and manage urban transitions 
  • Apply these methods in a hands on project regarding an urban area transition or niche experiment, deal with stakeholders and report results (written and orally).

Summary of contents

I Challenges 

 a- The challenge of sustainable development: population and consumption growth exceeding the planetary limits. 

       - Local and global 

       - Technology, the culprit? 

       - Pollution, consumption and equity 

       - Global equity and world order 

 b- Climate Change mitigation 

 c- Climate Change adaptation 

 d- Eco Systems, Pollution, emissions, waste and waste water 

 e- Resource scarcity, recycling, circular material flows 

 f- Urban health challenges in the built environment: clean air, noise, clean water, green areas, urban heat 

 

II Methods 

  1. Systems dynamics and lock in, in urban systems
  2. Future studies, backcasting and scenario planning
  3. Urban geo-information acquisition and processing
  4. Governance and participation methods
  5. Business planning, ROI and Societal ROI of Urban systems 
  6. Site visits to see technological options and hear ‘the story’

  

III Project 

Choice: 

  • Participative scenario planning of energy transition in a specific urban area, in The Hague 
  • Analyzing and defining niche experiments for urban transitions in The Hague. 
  • Analyzing and defining urban symbiosis opportunities and evaluating options

Leerdoelen

Participants will learn to work transdisciplinary on defining, designing and implementing solutions for the grand challenges of the city of tomorrow. They will learn: 

  1. to work in teams,
  2. to communicate with stakeholders,
  3. to analyze and process information regarding the built environment
  4. to use geographic information tools
  5. to analyze technological systems and their potential for innovation
  6. to draw conclusions, based on quantitative and qualitative data, regarding the performance of a specific urban area, and its potential for improvement
  7. to define strategies for change

Aanvullende informatie

Target group 

This minor program is particularly interesting for students that want to contribute to sustainable cities. Particularly students of architecture, spatial planning, management, public administration, social sciences, civil engineering, mechanical engineering.

 

Teaching methods + study load 

Part I and II will be taught by lectures, followed by tutorials and exercises. 

Larger exercises will take place regarding geo-information systems and the use of open data. Excursions and site visits will be important to obtain first-hand knowledge and meet stakeholders. 

 

The 5 elements of part I will each take a 4 hour session being half lecturing and half tutorial. Each element will be accompanied by self-study material, and some small exercises (4 additional hours). 

The first 5 elements of part II  (a-e) will each require 4 hours of lecture/tutoring, 4 hours of reading, and 2 days of exercises.  

the site visits/excursions will require 2 days and 3 additional days for elaborating an active assignment for each visit, and presenting and discussing this assignment. 

 

Assignment preparation 5 days. 

 

Partners 

Municipality of The Hague, local residents organizations, atelier PRO (architects), housing corporations, Antea Group (Geographical information service), energy (related) companies. 

 

Minimum and maximum participation 

The minimum number of students for this minor program is 15, the maximum number of students who can enroll in this minor is 40. For the year 2019/20 the maximum number of participants is limited to 30. We aim for a 50/50 division of THUAS participants and participants from abroad. 

Ingangseisen

This minor program is particularly interesting for students that want to contribute to sustainable cities. Particularly students of architecture, spatial planning, management, public administration, social sciences, civil engineering, mechanical engineering   

  1. Participants should have finished 2 years of studies at BSc level.
  2. Participants should have an adequate proficiency in English to be able to cooperate with international colleagues and stakeholders.
  3. Participants should have a basic understanding of mathematics and statistics in order to be able to participate in analyzing statistical data and systems behavior. 

Requirement 1 will be checked by the institution of the participant. Requirements 2 & 3 will only be checked in the first week of the minor program. If participants feel insecure about meeting these standards, they might apply for a voluntary check before.   

Toetsing

Part I and II of the minor will be tested by a brief assignment, taking place in the 10th week of the minor program. The mark of this assignment will be 30% of the total mark. However, students will have to meet the ‘pass’ level. Participants that do not pass have to submit an additional assignment within 3 weeks of the date that the first assignment was due. 

For part III, participants will be judged by a group assignment. There will be a group mark for the final report (40 % of total mark) and its presentation (30% of total mark). Each group will be required to give a statement regarding the contribution of each team member. Participants that do not obtain a ‘pass’ level as a total score can improve their mark by an additional assignment.

 

Part I and II will be taught by lectures, followed by tutorials and exercises. 

Larger exercises will take place regarding geo-information systems and the use of open data. Excursions and site visits will be important to obtain first-hand knowledge and meet stakeholders. 

teaching methods and studyload;

The 5 elements of part I will each take a 4 hour session being half lecturing and half tutorial. Each element will be accompanied by self-study material, and some small exercises (4 additional hours). 

The first 5 elements of part II  (a-e) will each require 4 hours of lecture/tutoring, 4 hours of reading, and 2 days of exercises.  

the site visits/excursions will require 2 days and 3 additional days for elaborating an active assignment for each visit, and presenting and discussing this assignment. 

Assignment preparation 5 days

Literatuur

A reader will be made for this minor program. It will contain (parts of): 

Allen, A. (Ed.), Lampis, A. (Ed.), Swilling, M. (Ed.). (2016). Untamed Urbanisms (Open Access). London: Routledge. 

Simon Elias Bibri, 2018, Allen, A. (Ed.), Lampis, A. (Ed.), Swilling, M. (Ed.). (2016). Untamed Urbanisms (Open Access). London: Routledge. 

Backcasting in futures studies: a synthesized scholarly and planning approach to strategic smart sustainable city development, European Journal of Futures Research (2018) 6:13 

Mulder, K. (Ed.). (2017). Sustainable development for engineers: A handbook and resource guide. Routledge.

Hajer, T. Dassen, 2014, Smart about cities: visualizing the challenge for 21st century urbanism, Rotterdam: nai010 publishers

Peter Bosch, Sophie Jongeneel, Vera Rovers (TNO), Hans-Martin Neumann (AIT), Miimu, Airaksinen and Aapo Huovila (VTT). CITYkeys indicators for smart city projects and smart cities, TNO. 

Urban Synergies Group, 2016, shaping healthy communities, www.urbansynergies.org

Rooster

Contact hours per week 

Contact hours per week:  

Term 1: 10 hours of lectures/tutorials, 8 hours of supervised exercises 

Term 2: 4 hours of general progress meeting, 8 hours of group supervision